Riky Rick Exodus

Directed by the renowned Kyle Lewis, Ricky Rick’s Exodus is a unique cross-pollination of genres – a mixed palette where music video meets short film. Three tracks from Ricky Rick’s album ‘Family Values’ are presented in three different vignettes steeped in myth and symbolism, each piece a stand alone narrative as well as a collective, nuanced story of catharsis.

On this production, I had the honour of working with an insanely talented team, consisting of Producer Will Nicholson, D.O.P Pierre de Villiers, Stylist Kaley Meyer, Editor Stephen Du Plessis, and a host of talent from Khayelitsha Site C, Cape Town.

Apart from the usual AD responsibilities of keeping the schedule, my other roles on Exodus included driving the bakkie, light-swinging and smoke-bomb supervision!

To date, the Awards won by Riky Rick’s Exodus include a Silver Loerie for “TELEVISION, FILM AND VIDEO COMMUNICATION: MUSIC VIDEOS” as well as a Feature on the international SHOTS website

Tokyo Weekend

Imagine a city of wires, of networks and circuit boards. A city where the arcade chimes of prizes, the clinking of coins and metallic squeals of excitement echo around you, buzzing alongside an endless trail of shimmering lights. This city is electric, it hums quietly with the static of millions of lives. It pulsates.

This city is Tokyo, and it is the furthest East I have ever been.

From the onset you are infused in technology, of scanners and screen, automated gates, tickets and buttons. Everything happens in seconds, and you are gently pushed forward in a stream of information while you try get up to speed. As you race in to the city, you notice how clean and orderly everything is. The buildings stand millimetres away from each other in their own special place, the streets are so clean they glow. Everything is efficient, even the compact doorways and windows try to conserve as much space as possible. Things are vastly different here, but that calm, polite static pervades the city, never leaving anyone behind.

The first stop is Asakusa, the ‘old town’. Although there is an antiquated air to the spotless streets, even they have been fused with supersonic tech. Here, thick cables wrap around ancient temples, and multicoloured lights glow from within paper lanterns. A Maiko, an apprentice Geisha, shuffles past airbrushed graffiti.

Next up is Akihabara, the Manga centre of Tokyo. Here, the old is only drawn and laminated, portrayed in saturated comic books as fantasy heroes, veneered to the sides of buildings for a few months at most. This is a land of Lego, of plastic and pachinko games.

Dusk is the perfect setting for the next adventure; a short trip through Shibuya, the busiest (and probably most photographed) intersection in the world, before heading to the centre of this sprawling chandelier, Shinjuku. This is the hub of Tokyo, packed to the brim with bars ranging in size from three storey restaurants to tiny rooms where the bartender takes up half the space. Each room is its own universe, the decorations ranging from leopard print covering every surface in one, to a fake lobby to Hell in the next.

A morning in Harajuku contrasts the wild evening by dousing it in sugar. Hereis where you’ll find the famous Lolita paraphernalia, the sweet and mischievous characters in anime that are dressed a specific way. Here the people sparkle in high-school-sweetheart outfits, and an army of Hello Kitties rampage through candyfloss covered stores.

Across the way is Yoyogi Park, the place it is said that takes on a Cosplay sheen every Sunday. Although the chances of spotting an intergalactic superhero isn’t certain, a lazy summer day in the park does offer a pool of manicured natural beauty amongst the towering skyscrapers.

And before you know it you are being whisked back to the airport, eyes shining and mind vibrating from the pulse of this cyber city. As you rise up through painted clouds from this vivid dream you are immediately left wanting more, to go back through the looking glass for just a little longer.

Credits:

Music: d’ne, “Like Physical (I Do Not Love. Remix)”

Camera: Canon 5DMkII

Editing Software: Avid Media Composer

Jozi Fight Night

So I took a gander to the lively Maboneng Precinct in the centre of Johannesburg last week to catch the first of hopefully many Fight Nights hosted by the Sir Stan’s Athletic Club.

It gave me a chance to get some shots of Jozi at night, and also to try my hand at the Avid Media Composer. More importantly, it was an excellent reminder of how lively this city can get on a Thursday night, with the Arts on Main Night Market happening in and amongst a multitude of restaurants, as well as an epic evening of boxing!

Here’s a taste of the tournament, and you can catch the next one on December 4th, not to mention a great evening out every Thursday at Arts on Main, 246 Fox Street, Johannesburg. A big high five to everyone who took part in the Fight Night, it was an awesome evening!

Music by Crux-Man To The Rescue: Mortal Komabt!!! (Creative Commons)

Christmas in Korea

A back post today, but considering the weather in some parts of the world it’s not completely off topic!

My first white Christmas, showing the train ride from Busan (부산) to Daejeon (대전) in South Korea on Christmas Day 2012.
Music: “White Christms” by Rigger (Otis Brown) *free download* https://soundcloud.com/riggermusic. | https://www.facebook.com/riggermusic
Shot using a Gopro Hero2

Filmed on the Mugunghwa (무궁화호) ‘slow’ train in South Korea, the cheaper but slower option to the KTX. From Busan station (the main station in Busan) to Daejeon station the trip was 3.5 hours, and cost around US$18. This train is much cheaper than the KTX if time isn’t of the essence, especially if you have some good company for the trip.

Merry Christmas and subscribe for more videos.
Bring on 2013, year of the Black Snake!

Beijing, China

The regal capital of the People’s Republic of China suits the icy grip of winter, a season that seems to bring the riddled history and fortified architecture of Beijing into sharp relief.

The journey toward the center of this grid-like city is much easier today than it was a few centuries ago, with the rigid square structure designed in such a way as to be nothing more than a series of gates. As such, you could quickly find out your social standing if you tried to make your journey to the Forbidden City, situated in the very middle.

At present, however, the area is a haven for hostels and great experiences of the city, ranging from Tiananmen Square to the Forbidden Palace, and a few notorious Hutongs (alleyways) thrown in for good measure. For a more contemporary side to this metropolitan powerhouse, head towards the 798 Art District in the North East of the city,

Cinematography and Editing:
Craig Groenewald

Music:
Inspired and the Sleep, “Sink”

Equipment:
GoPro Hero 2
Adobe CS6 (Camera Raw, Bridge, Illustrator, Premiere Pro, After Effects)

Namhae, South Korea

석가탄신일, or Buddha’s Birthday, happened to occur on a Friday this year, which meant a long weekend for most of the inhabitants of South Korea. A popular destination for the celebration was Namhae Island, located in the south of South Korea, which is where many families, as well as quite a few expatriot teachers chose to spend their Friday.

Although this clip is missing the signature Lanterns of the festival, the popular tradition of lighting fireworks during the evening was eagerly upheld.

Cinematography and Editing: Craig Groenewald
Music: Pick A Piper, All Her Colours (Sun Glitters Remix)
https://soundcloud.com/bad-panda-reco… (published under a CC Licence)
Equipment: Canon 5D Markii, GoPro Hero2, Adobe CS6

Namhae

Guardians of Thailand

The Temples in Bangkok are some of the best places to see the intricate art that permeates Thai culture. These ‘Wats’ (as they are called in Thai) are filled with sculptures and artwork that serve to inspire, guide and protect those who seek it. Many of these sculptures allude to particular Bodhisattva’s, or Guardians, who are meant to embody a particular form of mercy, advice, or prayer.
This clip hopes to commemorate these guardians, not only in the metaphysical sense, but the guardians of culture, spirit and identity that can be found in a very real sense throughout Thai culture.

Music: Sad Soul Circus, ‘Colorful Lights’ (https://soundcloud.com/sadsoulcircus)
Location: Bangkok, Thailand (Wat Saket, Wat Pho, Grand Palace, Wat Phrakaew), January 2013
Film and Editing: Craig Groenewald
Equipment: GoPro Hero2 and Canon 5D Mk2

The eternal recurrence of human stories, and the Bodhisattva's put here to help guide us through them.
The eternal recurrence of human stories, and the Bodhisattva’s put here to help guide us through them.